• LOCATION : Single Dwelling, Sydney
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The distinct expressiveness of 83 Cann Street is unmistakably modern as the form of the building dances across the site both horizontally and vertically. Without the burdensome intrusion of covered car parking cluttering the façade, we are left with a contemporary, minimalistic form that cuts a clean silhouette out of the blue sky and lush green landscape. Divided into two + five evenly proportioned zones, the detail entwined in the design seeps through the façade down into the very heart of the programming.

With fine yet definitive black window and door framing that fall against the white render like crisp lines of black ink, this understated yet sublime façade conceals the five ‘zones’ which constitute the interior. By dividing up the layout in this carefully considered way, the architecture achieves a sense of rhythm and cohesion that is consistent across the entire site.

The first interior ‘zone’ covers half the width of the site and allows the architecture to reach forward in a most articulate way to beckon one off the street. This entry is doubly marked by the huge glass door with stark black framing that allows a straight-shot of vision through the entire building and out the other side. The sense of space is magnified as the eye is drawn along this path. At first floor level, the Master Bedroom is offered a commanding position at the front of the home.

The second ‘interior’ zone spreads boundary-to-boundary, making full use of the width of the site to draw you into a welcoming living room and first port-of-call when entering the home. A full-height sliver of glazing offers tantalising glimpses of the outdoor space; specifically, the small pond which captures the light of the sun and causes it to dance through into adjacent rooms. This connection with the outdoors is maintained throughout the entire home. At first floor level, the study overlooks the water below and is bestowed with undeniable tranquillity.

The third interior ‘zone’ is the circulation hub and is constrained to the middle of the site by the pond and a side boundary. The full height glazing shamelessly absorbs the glittering light from the water, which helps illuminate the space and act as a beacon to the centre of the home. Service spaces such as pantries and laundry area are located across the hall, with a secondary set of stairs leading to the basement parking below. At first floor level, the curved grand stair leads up to the first of three additional bedrooms all with ensuite bath.

The fourth interior ‘zone’ is undeniably the hub of the home, containing the kitchen, generous butler’s pantry and dining, all with an outlook over the lap pool following the side boundary, adjacent to the pond. While the pool pushes the ground floor plan to one side, at first floor level this zone enjoys a dramatic cantilever over the water to accommodate two of the three secondary bedrooms. The house is able to drink light through every opening, maximising the presence of the water.

The fifth interior ‘zone’ houses the formal lounge and living space, utterly entwined with the outdoor space through the wall of glass doors looking over the rear yard.

Continuing on from the living area is one of two exterior ‘zones’, whereby an entertainer’s paradise can be found. Mechanical shade structures shelter dining, sitting and lounging areas that stretch deeper into the site, almost to the rear boundary. The lap pool widens to include a wading area, perfect for lounging or playful youngsters. Subtle and delicate greenery softens the rigidity of the architecture and helps to settle the white rendered forms into the site, which is surrounded by neighbouring landscape.

One’s journey through the property concludes at the rear of the site with an elegantly proportioned, self-contained granny flat, which faces back into the property and towards the pool. The architecture ensures that every space enjoys a relationship to at least one body of water, reflecting the personal connections of the residents to this particular form of nature, and maximising the atmospheric benefits such relationships provide.